It makes sense. Working remotely is hard to give up. Work/life balance can be achieved by mixing in everyday life’s requirements with project milestones, which leaves time at the end of the day for loved ones’ attention, life passions, hobbies, or simple, relaxing pleasures. As well, the negatives of office life are avoided. Awkward conversations, poor manners on display, pointless meetings, superiority complexes, work/life balance challenges, etc., are some examples that in absence limits distractions that enable projects to be completed on-time and on-task. 

Searching for a new role can be compared to a part-time job. Motivation must be high for a worker to take the time for all the nuances of a job search. Combined with the ease of remote work life, these workers are less likely to job search.

According to OperationsInc, a HR, Recruiting, Training, and Payroll & HRIS Technology consulting company, fully remote workers are least likely to job search (26%) compared to hybrid workers (40%), and in-person workers (33%). OperationsInc surveyed 1000 U.S. workers who work at the SMB and Enterprise level and across all ages.   

David Lewis, CEO OperationsInc.
David Lewis, CEO OperationsInc.

“Employees in 2022 want control over their work arrangements, robust training opportunities, and supportive communication from leadership,” said David Lewis, OperationsInc CEO. “As our survey results show, employees who don’t find these at their current job are willing to walk away and find new employers.” 

While the data reinforces many executive’s opinions that remote work is a talent retention tool, the interesting trend from the survey is that hybrid workers are more likely to job search than those who are in-person all the time. It can be concluded that hybrid workers are more likely to job search because they want a fully remote workplace. And those in the office all the time, prefer that work style, which is why they’re less likely to job hunt. Either way, it’s an all or nothing workplace choice. 

Lou Calamaras, CCWP

Lou founded ContingentWorkforce.com in 2021 with the intention to bring global attention and innovation coverage to the external workforce sector. Spending the first decade of his career focused on niche B2B digital media production, Lou transitioned into Executive Recruiting and then global Contingent Workforce management, where in 2017 he earned the Certified Contingent Workforce Professional certificate. Lou’s career provided experience under multiple workforce classifications, whether as a contractor, sole proprietor, business owner, or employee. Lou lives in the Chicagoland area, where he is active in several local communities and volunteers for Meals on Wheels. When not working you’ll find him excited to spend time with his wife and rough-housing with his two boys. If you are interested in how the audience of ContingentWorkforce.com can help your organization, please send Lou a message. Lou@ContingentWorkforce.com